POOP the game

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POOP: The Game That Challenges Gamers Not To Clog The Toilet
 
POOP uses simple rules similar to UNO where the first player to run out of cards wins. A Toilet Card is flipped to determine how much poop can be played in a round. Players take turns playing poop cards but must be careful not to clog the toilet. Along the way players can ‘flush’ the toilet and some of the cards require them to make various bathroom sounds on their turn.

“We really wanted a game that was fun for kids and adults,” said Blaise Sewell, game co-creator and designer. “We also turned POOP into a raucous drinking game that makes it a pretty great party game too.”

POOP’s debut on Kickstarter may be proof of the game’s wide appeal. In the first week after they released POOP it already had achieved 85 percent of the initial Kickstarter goal. Kickstarter is an online pledge system for funding creative projects and is used to generate money for start up costs through crowdsourcing.

“It’s hard not to look ahead at this point,” he said. “We love seeing this much enthusiasm and already have an Expansion Deck we’re going to make available should we reach $9,000 in this campaign.”

Their Kickstarter commercial is almost as remarkable as the actual game. Shot to look like a late-night infomercial, they’ve borrowed the worst parts of every nineties commercial you’ve ever seen, including the blue screen with credit cards and the classic line, “Sorry, no CODs.”

As the Kickstarter campaign continues to raise money for launching the printed game, a digital print-and-play is available for free.

Feels Right Design creates campaigns for non-profit organizations like Amnesty International, CODEPINK, Project Sakinah, and NORML. Their mission, as stated on their website, is to design delightful political images for groups with a limited marketing budget and they make their work affordable through sales of their games.

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A mind that is stretched by a new experience can never go back to it's old dimensions.