Treasures & Trinkets: Gemstones and Art Objects (system neutral)

Treasures & Trinkets: Gemstones and Art Objects (system neutral)

This installment of the Treasures & Trinkets-series clocks in at 11 pages, 1 page front cover, 2 pages of advertisement, 1 page back cover, 1 page SRD, 1 page editorial/ToC, leaving us with 5 pages of content, so let’s take a look!

 

Now treasure is not and should not be equal to other treasure. From strange pictures to sculptures and elaborate tobacco pouches, there are a lot of objects to which value can be ascribed. As such, the pdf goes a different route than one would expect – the first 3 tables, each of which is 20 entries strong and lists sample pieces of art, from black pottery vases to wall mirrors and rugs of white gorilla fur. These cover a lot of ground, but unlike many dressing files, they actually are governed by general price – 25 gp, 250 gp and 750 gp values each have their own table. The art objects worth 2500 gp and 7500 gp also get their own tables, each of which are btw. 10 entries strong.

 

Really cool – there is a mini-table of value modifiers – 4 different results on that table can yield worse or better prices for the objects, allowing you to get even more out of the material herein. So, the art aspect works pretty well – then what about those gemstones?

 

Well, first, we receive a small glossary of up to 4 different gem types – from translucent to opaque, the respective categories are clearly defined. We begin with two d12-entry-strong tables of the least valuable stones, gaining a d10-table for those worth 100 gp, a d6 table for gems worth 500 gp, a d8-table for gems worth 1000 gp and finally, a 4-entry-strong table of gems worth 5K gp…though that table is erroneously headed by a d6 instead of a d4 in a minor hiccup. The different qualities of gemstone allow for an even more detailed modification of base prices via a d10-table, once again getting more mileage out of every single entry.

 

The pdf does go on step beyond all of these, though: On the last pages, reputedly magical effects of gemstones that may or may not be true can be found and add a nice sense of magic and cohesion to the subject matter. Additionally, there is a final table that consists of two parts, both of which are 12 entries long: The first lets you determine a special property for the gemstone, while the second presents a complication and/or opportunity: From significant sizes to strange cuts and mystical glowing, the special appearances are nice – and from trapped adventurers to fakes or acting as keys, the latter similarly are interesting.

 

Conclusion:

Editing and formatting are very good, I noticed no significant hiccups. Layout adheres to RagingS wan Press’ elegant two-column b/w-standards with nice b/w-artworks. The pdf comes fully bookmarked for your convenience and in two versions – one optimized for screen-use and one that has been optimized for the printer- kudos!

 

Richard Green’s Treasures & Trinkets – installment regarding art and gems is an inspired little dressing file – that holds true in the system-neutral version as well. This is basically identical to the 5e-version, with only the evaluating DCs to determine the prices purged. This is not bad, mind you – the resulting pdf still provides a ton of mileage, but I couldn’t help but wonder is some sort of additional option for the system-neutral version wouldn’t have been prudent here. If you’re playing both 5e and OSR material, you may thus want to go for the 5e-version; if, however, you absolutely loathe system-relevant material…well, then this one if the file to go for. For me, this iteration has a tiny bit less to offer, which is why it will “only” receive a final verdict of 5 stars – this pdf still very much represents a fantastic offering for the price-point, though.

 

You can get this cool pdf here on OBS!

 

You can directly support Raging Swan Press here on patreon!
Endzeitgeist out.

 

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About Endzeitgeist

Reviewer without a cause